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Marvel’s Agent Carter: A Heroine in the making

Captain America is probably the most iconic superhero next to Iron Man, and Marvel’s move to play them against each other is a wise one. However, that doesn’t mean Cap and Iron Man don’t have long, storied histories. The First Avenger did a lot to solidify his reputation as the do-good freedom fighter with a strong sense of morality, but that doesn’t mean he didn’t have any help along the way. One of the most important characters who helped him build up his confidence is Peggy Carter. In the film, she takes a secondary role, but doesn’t act passively. She isn’t just the prize, she gives Cap confidence, all the while kicking ass all on her lonesome. So, how does her run on TV fare in comparison to the movie universe?

Peggy Carter, the founder of S.H.I.E.L.D.

A Bigger Role told in Smaller Parts
The show wouldn’t be called Agent Carter if the spotlight wasn’t thrown squarely in her direction. Taking place a few months after Steve Rogers’ death, Peggy is sent to the SSR, a secret government organization to continue her work. Here lies the twist, however, because the work she is assigned is far below her station. After helping Cap, fighting a war, and having a hand in the downfall of Hydra, Peggy becomes a glorified secretary. At the same time, Howard Stark plays a big role. Like his son after him, the weapons he creates are often sold, and because that, the US government see him as a merchant of death.

Not just a dame in a dress.

These are the main plotlines and intrigues the series unveils over its 8-episode run, and the writers give everyone justice. Instead of relying on standard story tropes, they subvert every character in one way or the other. Peggy, in particular, is a strong protagonist in that she doesn’t accept her new, secondary role in the office. At the same time, she doesn’t lash out or act irrationally in a situation where anyone who has already proven themselves, would. Peggy has to help Stark clear his name, and that means she can’t fall to the perils anger.

Forward thinking in an Older Time
One can’t help but praise the series and how it uses a few progressive themes to its advantage. However, most of them are mired in some of the old stereotypes which run perfectly with the 50’s environment. Every one of her peers thinks that because she’s a woman, she is supposed to be delegated to doing menial tasks. Peggy, after getting over the initial shock, starts using this to her advantage. In fact, many of the female characters in the series use their perceived weaknesses and turn them into strengths.

These guys start out looking bad, but you grow to like them as the series goes along.

Agent Carter is also about dealing with consequence in the wake of hard decisions. Characters like Sousa and Thompson, who are both war vets, have to deal with their situations. The former was crippled and faces discrimination because of his handicap. Thompson, on the other hand, has to deal with maintaining a war-hero facade while keeping a secret that racks him with guilt. Every character here is strongly written, but my favorite moments are when Peggy and Jarvis bounce off of each other during their conversations.

They truly do make the perfect foils for one another.

Conclusion
It stands as a testament that at the end of this series, most of the people doubting Peggy’s abilities take a 180 turn and are even awed at her ability to out-spy a spy agency. Every character has their faults and strengths which the writers consistently build on with well thought out character development. I would say that Agent Carter’s 8-episode run is its only fault, but truly, if the show ran the standard 23 episode length, the quality of the writing and the direction it took will surely have suffered. You’ll probably end up binge watching the series, and re-watching it because Agent Carter is highly addictive. Definitely watch the show when you can.

Country Boy ethics with too much vague rhetoric. Plus video games, rap, rock, and films.
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Weekly Comic Round-Up: Hawkeye

Marvel's Hawkeye

You know what sucks about being an Avenger? The only time when being an Avenger, a hero of goodness and Ass Kickery, sucks? It’s when you’re the one who slings a bow and arrow around his back and has no super powers. Oh it well and truly sucks a nut being Hawkeye.

But there are some upsides which Matt Fraction jauntily points out as he sees us through the quirky life of the purple archer just trying to make ends meet outside of the group and S.H.I.E.L.D.

We open up this comic series to a scene; Hawkeye is performing his special grappling arrow move. Then, he fails at it, falling quickly unto the roof of a car and breaking several bones in the process. After that, we see the aftermath of something tragic. Clint Barton hurtles into the hospital holding a severely hurt dog. These are just the introductory pages to a vigilante story told in a very unique manner.

Over the course of 20 issues, I’ve come to love Hawkeye and his unlucky ways. He isn’t like the rest of Avengers because his code of ethics falls firmly on the chaotic Robin Hood side of goodness.

Clint Barton, outside of the Avengers, suffers a lot of things we have to go through, daily. He’s almost constantly broke, stealing money from the vaguely Eurasian thugs that he keeps crossing paths with. His renown spreads over time, however, as the people of his building start to respect him for his vigilante ways. No one there, however, has any illusions of who Clint really is.

Oh, Matt doesn’t try to dismiss Hawkeye’s love life either. For anyone who wonders about Black Spider and Clint’s relationship? Well Hawkeye regards her as his ‘Work Wife’. Funny, huh? And there’s Kate… Oh Kate, lovely, Lady Hawkeye.

Hawkeye

Hawkeye

Hawkeye is one of those comics that exude a great amount of warmth by telling us a story that is familiar. Clint’s not the best Avenger in the world, he’s isn’t even the most popular. That leaves him with a bit of a minority complex so he tends to overcompensate, a lot. However, no matter how surrounded he is, he’ll always find a way out relatively unscathed.

Unfortunately, that fight instinct also applies to the way he deals with the people trying to help. Our comic protagonist is filled with conflicting morals like this, and so he tends to screw up even when he has the best intentions in mind. This complexity in character makes him much more relatable than his super-powered counter parts.

He’s an excellent addition to Marvel’s ever growing list of unique but powerfully written characters.

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Country Boy ethics with too much vague rhetoric. Plus video games, rap, rock, and films.
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Weekly Comic Round-Up: Ms. Marvel

Dark comics are fun to read and number in the hundreds. Bedlam freaks you out by dragging you through a city of serial killers. Preacher makes the argument that if there was a God, he can be callous, narcissistic, and maybe even sociopathic. Southern Bastards tells a personal story filled with country side violence.

However, these grim comics offer very little in the way of bright moments and instead use dark humor as a means to make smile.

Sometimes you gots ta have a little levity in your life, and there’s a ton of that to be found in Marvel’s reboot of Ms. Marvel.

Delicious Infidel Meat

Delicious Infidel Meat

Now what strikes me as awesome about this comic is that it’s very non-traditional. That image above is of our heroine Kamala. She’s a Pakistani-American who actively practices the Islamic faith. That’s right; Marvel took one helluva step forward and added someone very different to their roster of heroes.

Now, Ms. Marvel is awesome for many reasons. It’s about a young, out of place girl who’s just trying fit in with her American peers. She’ also a complete nerd; often writing Avengers fan fictions for fun, and she also identifies as short and awkward.

All of it is actually very reminiscent of how Peter Parker found his start and his crowd, but Kamala is significant in another way.

Ms. Marvel reaches out to more than just the young, awkward male teen. It crosses borders and tells kids around the world being a hero doesn’t mean you have to be of a specific gender, or race. Don’t get me wrong though, Ms. Marvel is fun in its own right. Kamala is a charming character filled with personal quirks that will make you pitch a fit of laughter.

She’s still trying to find her identity in a world where most heroes seem to be predominantly white.

Being a person of color and of a different creed makes that even harder for her to achieve. There’s even a scene where she uses her powers to appear like the traditional Ms. Marvel, blonde, slender and Caucasian because she wouldn’t believe a person like her is what a standard heroine looked like.

Ms. Marvel isn’t just about a teen struggling through High School life. It’s also about the under representation of people who are different in popular media. The comic’s being brave; standing up for something new in a time when we need a little more of that in the world, and that makes me feel like everything’s gonna be marvelous.

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Country Boy ethics with too much vague rhetoric. Plus video games, rap, rock, and films.
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Marvel Heroes 2015 Gameplay

Marvel Heroes 2015

This game has been out since June 4, 2013 but we haven’t been able to try it out. Finally we got around to do that so here’s some gameplay footage of Rocket Raccoon in game.

We Simply Game. Nerd talk about anything and everything we come across with.
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Hooray Thanos

Thanos - Not A Gas Cloud

We are happy to see that Thanos has been given the proper state of matter, we already saw him trailing the final seconds of the Avengers movie, but it was just so reassuring to see all limbs in place. I’m sure Marvel/Disney has learned the consequences of turning a bad ass villain into a gas cloud, i.e. Galactus, and will keep closer to Thanos’ true story line this time around(We said close).

We Simply Game. Nerd talk about anything and everything we come across with.
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This Deadpool Test Footage Is Still Up Despite It Being Shot Down A Bazillion Times

Deadpool - Can't Kill Him

Like Deadpool, this test footage seems to have the power of regeneration.

We Simply Game. Nerd talk about anything and everything we come across with.